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    How to edit the startup.rphs file!

    Support Status: How To
     "How do I edit the startup.rphs" or "How do I make plugins load without doing it manually?"  Well, I'm here to show you.
     
    REQUIREMENTS:
    Notepad++ (https://notepad-plus-plus.org)
    Lasted Version of LSPDFR 
     
    EDITING STARTUP.RPHS:
    Go to your GTAV root directory Right click the startup.rphs file, choosing "Edit with Notepad++". It should look something like this:
       Click it, open up the file. You should get something like this: 
    Edit to your needs! Enjoy!  
     
    Useful information 
    You should put WarnOnPluginLoad false on the top, so plugins such as Finkone's Police Radio can load once.
    You should only load plugins you trust - don't load plugins that seem sketchy.
    You don't need the quotation marks when putting a plugin in the startup.rhps, for example: You don't need quotes when loading PoliceRadio.dll as it is one word, but you need quotes when loading LSPDFR First Responce.dll because it has spaces.
    For example, here's my startup.rphs:

     
     
     
     
     

    How to make your ELS lights brighter!!

    Hello!! I'm here to show you how to make your ELS lights brighter, if you are using a ENB that you really like but the ELS lights are not bright, this is the tutorial for you!!
    (Pictures included if need)
     
     
     
    1) Go to your GTA directory

     
    2) Go to Common/Data

     
    3) Look for Visualsettings.dat
    4) once you find it, open it and look for "# other.emmisive.lights"
     

     
    5) Change "car.default.emissive.on" to 100,
    6) When you get in-game, if it's too bright, lower the number, if it's not bright enough, make it a higher number
     
     
    Any questions or comments? Post them below or PM me!!

    Stars Don't Die In Liverpool Review

    Despite roles in It’s A Wonderful Life, The Big Heat and Oklahoma!, plus an Oscar on her shelf, Gloria Grahame’s fame hasn’t endured like other stars of her era. She’s more a good answer to a quiz question than a household name these days. Paul McGuigan’s drama is a fond look at the final years of Grahame’s life, telling the sweet tale of a relationship that lit her up long after her star wattage had faded.
     
    In 1981, aged 57, Grahame is eking out the last of her celebrity on the stage. She collapses before a performance, which she explains away as “gas”. Grahame calls former lover Peter Turner, a twentysomething actor in Liverpool, and asks if she can come to recuperate at his family home. The timeline then splits between scenes of Grahame elegantly dying under the care of Peter’s indomitable mother (Julie Walters), and flashbacks to Grahame and Turner’s brief but passionate romance.
     
     
    The film grows ever more sentimental, but a degree of melodrama is earned from the off. McGuigan gives a sense of low-key glamour to the early scenes. Turner arrives on screen lit by the tiny firework burst of a cigarette flicked against a wall. A standard Liverpudlian terrace is leant some drama by lurid wallpaper and strong light through dusty windows. It heightens the ordinary and provides the right backdrop for an out-of-the-ordinary affair. Grahame and Turner’s fling begins with frantic disco-dancing over cocktails and continues at a similar energy. In just a couple of years together they zip between LA, New York and Liverpool, chasing adventure, clutching onto the honeymoon period.
     
    Though they’ve little in common, they convince as a couple genuinely in love. The age difference is obviously a recurring factor, but it’s not hammered, mainly jabbing to the surface in moments of insecurity for Grahame, who palpably yearns to be young again. They seem so at ease in each other’s presence, at least until the truth of Grahame’s illness begins to encroach, which is significantly down to terrific leads.
     

     
    It’s a gift of a role for Bening, who gets to play the sashaying film star, so glamorous she even drinks milk from a champagne flute, and treats herself to effectively one long death scene. She doesn’t wring it dry but finds poignant details in a woman whose persona can tend toward the cartoonish. She speaks in a sing-song Marilyn Monroe voice, but it slips when she loses control of herself. It suggests a woman for whom every minute is performance, to others and herself. Bell is her match in a much quieter role.
     
    We can see Grahame’s death coming toward us like a train in a tunnel and McGuigan isn’t entirely subtle when it comes, but a character this big shouldn’t go out quietly. She deserves her moment before the spotlight goes out foreve
     

    Some of the Top Games on Twitch in 2017

    Twitch has come a long way since it's introduction to the gaming world, and we are all grateful for their services. They have thousands of games where players can stream and show other users what happens within the game they are playing at the time. Some play very popular games like league of legends and call of duty while others will stream super Mario bros because they have a sort of nostalgia when it comes to gaming. Obviously, the more popular the game, the more viewers you usually will get when streaming. Some gamers even make a full-time income when it comes to streaming. They will receive donations from their viewers in sums of $1 to the highest I've seen at $500 just for playing a video game and interacting with their viewers.

    Some of these streamers are making $100,000+ a year just to play video games, that would be nice if we all could do this 

    I'm not really here to talk about the streamers, even though some of them are pretty awesome to watch, I'm here to talk about the top games that are being streamed on twitch at the moment. And they are:
     
    League of Legends
    League of Legends, or just "League" as it's referred to by most of the players, is a fast-paced and very competitive online multiplayer game which combines the speed and intensity of an RTS as well as having some RPG elements. There are two teams of players, or champions, who have unique abilities who fight head to head in different types of battle modes on various maps. League of Legends has an enormous amount of replayability, unlike most games, because of the constant updates and the draw of big tournaments.

    PLAYERUNKNOWNS BATTLEGROUNDS
    This game came on the scene out of nowhere and has been fighting league of legends for the top spot since it started gaining players. This is a last man standing, battle royale, type of game which has been needed in the gaming world for a long time now. Many companies have tried to build a game type like this but failed miserably because of the time it takes for the programming and updates. This game has also picked up its nickname PUBG from the community since it's much shorter and easier to type than PLAYERUNKNOWNS BATTLEGROUNDS 

    Rocket League
    This game is made for people of all ages since it combines RC cars and soccer. It sounds like an odd game, I even thought it didn't look fun until I played it, and it's incredibly addictive. You can play solo, duo or a team game with friends or random players. There are seasons you can play in order to unlock skins and cosmetics, which don't give you a bonus or boost when playing against other players. You can also play pick up games with other players, but I would recommend getting better than the AI before you play other gamers, because they are extremely good at this game and make the AI look like a chump.

    Call of Duty: Ghosts
    This game franchise has been around for a while and has gotten a ton of attention from the gaming community. It's bloody fps that allow you to team up with friends or run solo in order to win your game mode of choice. If you don't know what COD is, and you call yourself a gamer, you obviously have been living under a rock for a long time lol.

    Hearthstone
    This game is basically a tabletop card game in a digital environment. Have you ever heard of WoW which is an abbreviation of World Of Warcraft? Well, Hearthstone is based on WoW when it comes to its monsters and power levels. You don't get to use weapons in this game since your cards are pre-set, but it's still a pretty sweet time killer and I would suggest you check it out if you liked the Warcraft style gaming.

    Fifa 18
    This game franchise has been out for a while now and has always been popular with anyone who loves soccer. You can pick your team and play seasons, just like in the real world and how soccer is run. I myself don't play this game because I've never been a fan of soccer, but I can see this being very popular in Europe and pretty much anywhere other than the United States.

    Destiny 2
    This fps is a futuristic fantasy type of shooter. You have exotic style guns that might mimic guns you see in the real world, but not too much. Bungie and Activision were the developers of this game, which is the second in the series, and it seems to have a lot of players fading away due to it being too repetitive and having a low replay value. I logged almost 3,000 hours into Destiny 1 and found Destiny 2 to be a boring adventure after you beat the storyline and play a few PvP matches 

    FortNite
    This game came on the scene not too long ago, or I should say it made waves not too long ago with their Battle Royale mode, which mimics the entire PUBG game setup. You can play solo, duo or squad games in the PvP mode that everyone loves, and your goal is to be the last man/team standing in order to win. There is also a PvE mode that people seem to love, but I haven't cracked down and purchased it yet so I can't comment too much on it lol. The developers of this game seem to be on top of things since they fix bugs and glitches almost immediately and since the battle royale launch, they have already done 2 big updates that give the players more to work with. More game modes, maps, and weapons are on the horizon for this game, and even though it's in beta it's still one of my favorite games at the moment 



    In Conclusion:
    Twitch streaming isn't anything new in the gaming community, but it could be new to you if you have been living under a rock. These are not all of the top games on twitch in 2017, just the ones I'm more familiar with. Other games that are topping the charts on twitch right now are Super Mario Odyssey, Counter-Strike, IRL, Heroes of the Storm, Warframe, Dota 2, Grand Theft Auto and Overwatch.

    How To Create An Email Account In cPanel

    Support Status: How To
     
    In this video we teach you and answer: How To Create An Email Account In cPanel. cPanel allows it's users to create email accounts if the hosting provider permits it. If you are new to the web hosting control panel called cPanel, the this cPanel Tutorial / Training video is for you.We will take you through the process step by step to make it simple and easy for you to pick it up in no time.

    Razer Developing Optical Keyboard Switches: Razer Purple

    Another homegrown member is coming to Razer’s keyboard switch family later this year or early next. Dubbed the Razer Purple switch (for now, although it may end up with a different name when it comes to market), it’s going to be the company’s first foray into optical switch technology.
     
    It’s more than just a switch, though; you can think of it as a platform onto which Razer will continue to build, and it’s the full realization of the company’s decision to develop its own production lines within switch-making factories.
     
    When Razer started playing with making its own switches, all the company really did was build a near clone of Cherry MX Blue switches, using multiple manufacturers for the task. Then it added a tactile Orange switch (essentially a clone of the Cherry MX Brown). Eventually the company sought more control over the process and now has its own production lines within its partners’ factories.
     
    Since then, it’s added the Yellow (linear) switch, the “mecha-membrane” switch, and a low-profile switch that’s made its way into a Razer Blade laptop.

     
    The Purple Platform
    To its credit, Razer has been unafraid to delve into experimental keyboard switch technology, and the Purple switch effort shows that in spades.
    Essentially, when the optical Purple switch debuts, it will be the first of multiple generations for Razer. Before it pushes the boundaries of what an optical can do, Razer is planning to just focus on getting all the fundamentals as perfect as possible: characteristics, actuation, reset, consistency, tolerance, keyfeel, bounce/return, and so on.
    Then, it will explore unlocking some of the benefits that optical switches can bring.
     
    The Optical Advantage
    Although optical switches and standard desktop mechanical switches are the same in that both use a plastic plunger mounted in a squarish housing, they have different sensing methods and are therefore implemented differently on keyboards. In the simplest of terms, whereas a standard mechanical switch has two metal contact points, an optical switch actuates when the plunger interrupts a light beam that emanates from the PCB.
     
    For a primer on how optical switches work, head here, but the upshot is that because of the difference in construction, optical switches have some advantages. 
     
    For instance, there’s no soldering, so the switches can be hot swappable, which means you can easily swap different types of switches. For example, you could load up a keyboard with clicky switches or linear ones, or a mix (whatever your heart desires), and change it back whenever you feel like it, like on the Epic Gear Defiant keyboard.
     
    Although we don’t have a way of testing it ourselves just yet, some optical switch makers claim that the inherent lack of metal debounce in optical switches makes them “faster.” We’ve also seen several demos of optical switch keyboards functioning underwater--in other words, you won’t nuke your expensive plank if you drop your water/beer/Mountain Dew on it.
     
    Analog?
    Most importantly, though, optical switches unlock the possibility of analog input on mechanical keyboards.
     
    We’re on record that analog keyboard input could become enormously important to gamers, but so far, there are just two analog mechanical keyboards in existence. One is a promising prototype, the Aimpad R5 (why has no one bought that IP yet?), and the other is the Wooting One (full review here).
    By dint of being a shipping product, Wooting has the advantage, but for all of the keyboard’s wonders, it still needs a bit of work. What analog technology needs is the focus of a big company with plentiful resources. Enter Razer.
     
    Platform Patience
    It’s surely exciting for gamers to imagine how quickly analog keyboard technology could accelerate once Razer gets behind it, but don’t hold your breath. As we mentioned above, Razer is pacing itself with the development of its optical switch platform.
     
    Don’t expect first-gen Purple switches to have analog input, or ever hot-swap capabilities. They’re going to be fine switches, but it won’t be until the second or third generation that we’ll likely see more of the features that optical switches offer over and above what standard desktop switches do.
     
    However, there’s a hidden advantage there, and that’s why we’re referring to this as a “platform:” Once the hardware is perfected, the technological upgrades can primarily come in the form of firmware and software updates--including analog capabilities. Therefore, it’s not at all unreasonable that we could see a Razer keyboard ship with first-gen Purple optical switches, and then you could keep that same keyboard and load up second-gen Purple switches when they’re available, or at some point install a big firmware update that enables analog sensing.
    Finally, it’s important to note that Razer’s efforts on the standard desktop mechanical switch side of things will continue unabated. The new Purple optical platform will alongside the Razer Green, Orange, and Yellow switches.
     
    What’s next for Razer and its keyboard switch skunkworks? Who knows, maybe we’ll see a version of the Hall Effect switch emerge at some point.

    Corsair HX1200 PSU Review

    Given Corair's highly successful RMx power supplies, which lack the digital interface found on all RMi models and use a different fan to bring costs down, the company thought to do something similar with its high-end HXi family. But instead of naming the new line HXx, which would have looked strange, Corsair simply removed the letter "i." After all, there was already a portfolio of HX PSUs. Now it's revamped with new members.
     
    The HX line-up includes four models with capacities ranging from 750W to 1200W. The biggest difference between Corsair's HXi and HX models, besides the latter's lower price, is the lack of software control/monitoring, since a digital interface circuit is missing from the HX family. Both the HXi and HX PSUs use the same 135mm FDB fan. It's incredibly quiet, even at high speeds, so we expect these lower-cost models to still feature great acoustic profiles under any circumstance.
     
    Apparently not every enthusiast wants a power supply with digital circuits. Some have no intention of connecting their PSU and motherboard, believing that simpler is often better. This also gets around an extra installation step, even if it's just one cable and some extra software.
     
    According to Corsair, the HX1200i and HX1200 we're reviewing today are separated by only $10. We figured the HX1200 would be significantly less expensive, making it more attractive. But that tiny delta compels us to lean towards the HX1200i, frankly. The only HX model with a notably lower price tag than its HXi equivalent is the HX750, which costs $30 less.
    At least all of the HX units are similarly modular, with the ability to toggle between one and multiple +12V rails through a switch on the PSU's rear panel (where the modular cables plug in).
     
    The same warranty that covers Corsair's highest-end PSUs also applies to the HXes, giving you 10 years of protection. With the cryptocurrency craziness in full swing, we expect a lot of HX units to power mining rigs operating at nearly full load continuously. Under such harsh conditions, a 10-year warranty could prove catastrophic if RMAs start rolling in at an accelerated rate. We don't think any power supply will last for prolonged periods of time under the kind of duress that mining imposes. We've even heard that some companies are thinking about cutting their coverage if a PSU is used for mining, though we're not sure how they plan to prove this.
     
    Corsair's HX1200 achieves a Cybenetics ETA-B rating and an 80 PLUS Gold certification. When it comes to noise, it is LAMBDA-A+-rated, indicating very quiet operation. The list of protection features is thorough; Corsair even offers OCP at +12V through a switch, located on the back of the PSU.
     
    The 135mm cooling fan uses a fluid dynamic bearing, so it should last quite a while. In a PSU backed by a hefty 10-year warranty, the fan has to be super reliable.
     
    A 20cm depth makes this a long PSU, indeed.
     
    Power Specifications

     
    The minor rails boast an impressive 150W of maximum combined power, while the +12V rail can deliver up to 100A if needed, handling the PSU's full power on its own. Lastly, the 5VSB rail is also quite strong with 17.5W capacity. We like to see 1kW+ PSUs with beefy 5VSB circuits.
     
    In the multi-+12V rail mode, there are eight +12V rails with 40A maximum current output each. All of the rails combined can deliver the same wattage (1200W) in single-rail mode, of course.
     
    Cables & Connectors

     
    There are two EPS connectors along with eight PCIe ones, all available at the same time. The number of SATA connectors is huge, while the eight four-pin Molex connectors should cover every need. Some miners would probably ask for 10 or 12 PCIe connectors, but Corsair obviously didn't have a cryptocurrency boom in mind when the HX1200 was being designed.
     
    Power Distribution
    As mentioned, there is a switch that lets you choose between one +12V rail or multiple ones. In the HXi models, this is achieved using the Corsair Link software. However, since the HX models don't have a digital interface, a different approach had to be used.
     
    The +12V rails can deliver up to 40A each if the multi-rail mode is selected. According to Corsair, each individual connector in this PSU has over-current protection, so no more than 40A goes through any given cable.
     
     

    EVGA Unleashes SC17 1080 Gaming Laptop

    EVGA announced its plans to cram a GTX 1080 into its SC17 gaming laptop back at Computex, and today, the SC17 1080 became available.
     
    The new EVGA SC17 1080 is mostly unchanged from its predecessor, the SC17 1070. It still features an overclockable Intel Core i7-7820HK Kaby Lake processor, 32GB (2x16GB) DDR4-2666 memory, a 256GB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD, a 1TB 7,200RPM HDD, and a 17.3” 3840 x 2160 IPS display with Nvidia G-Sync onboard. One of the few negatives from our review of the SC17 1070 was that the GPU was somewhat underpowered for gaming at 4K (although it was still better than its predecessor, the original EVGA SC17, which had a GTX 980M), but EVGA seems to keep throwing more graphics horsepower under the hood with every iteration, and the SC17 1080’s GTX 1080 should get you closer to comfortable framerates at the display’s native resolution.
     
    Another gripe we had with the SC17 1070 was that although it had enough horsepower to power virtual reality (VR) games and HMDs, it wasn’t entirely VR friendly, with only two USB 3.0 ports and a USB 3.1 Type-C port (with a Type-A adapter) residing on the opposite side of the chassis as the display outputs. Three ports is fine for running an HTC Vive (so long as you had a USB extension to get the cable near the display output), but not if you want to use the Oculus Rift with Touch (which requires four USB 3.0 connections).
     

     
    However, the SC17 1080 remedies these issues with three USB 3.0 ports, in addition to the USB 3.1 Type-C port (with a Type-A adapter), giving it enough connectivity to run an Oculus Touch setup. Even better, the third USB 3.0 port is right next to the display output (two mini DisplayPort 1.4 interfaces and an HDMI 2.0 port), making it much more adept for a mobile VR gaming solution.
     
    EVGA had to sacrifice some of the SC17 1070’s 1.07-inch profile to accommodate the new GPU, with the thickest part of the SC17 1080 measuring in at 1.3 inches. It’s thicker towards the back of the device (where the beefy cooling system and GPU is housed), but it thins out towards the front. The company also somehow managed to shave some weight off the SC17 in the process of bulking up, with the SC17 1080 listed at 8.93lbs to the SC17 1070's 9.04lbs.
     
    Both the CPU and GPU are overclockable using EVGA’s Precision XOC Mobile software or a hotkey preset (SC mode or downclock with EOC hotkeys), and the keyboard’s LED backlighting can also be controlled using the company-branded software.
     
    The EVGA SC17 1080 is available now on EVGA’s website for $3,000.
     

     

    Facebook's bringing 'Stories' to the desktop!

    It appears Facebook is not giving up on the Facebook Story. The social media giant is planning on expanding the vanishing pictures and videos to be visible on its desktop version as well as mobile. 
     
    Facebook Stories, the outrageous clone of the original Snapchat format, currently sits above the newsfeed in a central position on the Facebook app. The feature will now be moved to the right-hand side of the screen on the desktop, becoming the first time Stories has appeared on non-mobile devices.
     
    When a user's profile picture is clicked on, the Story will pop up, blacking-out the background of the desktop, as screenshots sourced by the French site Siécle Digitaldemonstrate. Facebook confirmed to TechCrunch that stories on the desktop is still a test but said it would be rolled out to a wider audience in the near future.
    Since Snapchat launched the 'Stories' format, Facebook's companies have been quick to adapt the feature for their own platforms. Instagram was the first to rip-off the Snapchat feature in the summer of 2016. Since then, Instagram Stories has grown to over 250 million daily users, crushing Snapchat’s 166 million.
     
    Facebook also joined in at the beginning of 2017, hoping to steal some of the success of Instagram (as did WhatsApp and Messenger). Outside of the Facebook companies, Tinder has introduced a feature that's similar to Stories. However, as the year has developed it has become clear that Instagram is now the chosen platform for users to share their visual communication.
     
    Unsurprisingly, TechCrunch reports that over half of businesses have made a story with Instagram over the past year while this number dwindles on Facebook.
    This is nowhere more evident than in the graveyard of Facebook’s story bar. In April 2017, instead of a blank space where stories should be, Facebook introduced blurred out, ghosted icons of your friends. An awkward reminder of its continued unpopularity. Still, an amusing irony considering the icon of the bruised Snapchat is a ghost.
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